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Adoption grants

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Becky Fawcett always wanted to have children.

"When I was growing up I just assumed I'd be pregnant and when everyone around me my friends were having trouble getting pregnant I was very sympathetic to them, but it never occurred to me that it would happen to me and it did."

After years of in-vitro fertilization treatments and three miscarriages, Fawcett and her husband decided to adopt. Jake came in 2005, and Brooke in 2009. Fawcett's lifelong dream of motherhood was realized but the cost took a toll on the family.

"Between the infertility treatments and my two adoptions we spent nearly $200,000 in after-tax dollars, so you do the math. That's not a normal amount of money to build your family," she said.

A grateful mother of two, Fawcett decided to pay it forward by starting Helpusadopt.org in 2007. It's a nonprofit that awards all types of families up to $15,000 in grant money to help with adoption costs.

She says unlike most adoption grant programs, the money --about $200,000 a year -- goes to families of all different configurations.

"A lot of people think that a child needs to be in a two-parent household," Fawcett said. "You can have a heterosexual married couple, you can have LGBT couples, you could have single parents, both male and female."

One of those single parents on the receiving end of the grants is Gigi Kearns. After losing $50,000 during a painful failed adoption attempt, Kearns said she was ready to give up on being a mom until she found out about the organization.

"I'm not one to ever ask for help, but because my dream was so big and I had been through so much heartache I decided to this time," Kearns said.

Help came in the form of a $10,000 grant. Then came a bundle of joy, little Olivia.

"I think it's a testament to everybody out there who's on this journey that they can't stop, they can't quit because their baby was out there, the baby will find you," Kearns said.

Fawcett said of her children: "They have completed me in a way that I never knew possible."

Helpusadopt.org is having an inclusive meet up for all types of adoptive families in New York City on September 28.

http://www.helpusadopt.org/

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