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Grocery-store etiquette

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Whether barricading shopping aisles with abandoned carts, massaging every piece of fruit in the building, or blankly staring at a shelf of items so no one else can pick one, grocery store pests can turn a quick trip to restock your fridge into a nightmare.

In the hope of gently educating those unclear on grocery-shopping etiquette, we asked you to help us put together a list of what not to do:

"Kids in the grocery store," one woman in the produce section said. "I don't like kids in the grocery store. They're like picking cherries. I want those cherries!"

Most we found stocked their complaint-shelves with fresh gripes pertaining to delays.

"Like: Oh, wait. I'm only here for peanut butter?" one woman mimicked. "Let me get two carts full of groceries."

"When you're in line and you forget something and you're next and you run and get it," the woman in the produce section said.

A few produced peeves with the store itself.

"They've completely moved the aisle somewhere else and you can't find your item," a man said.

But -- not ones to single bag a double standard -- all with whom we spoke admitted to breaking the grocery code a time or two themselves.

"I'm guilty," the woman in the produce section said.

"Just cussing up a storm," another woman said of herself, "and people are just like: Oh, my God. Look at that freak."

From the coupon-fumbler in the checkout line to the price-protester in the deli to the door-opener in frozen goods, supermarket scourges lurk everywhere.

One just might be you.

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