Unemployment fell in half of US states in May - Houston weather, traffic, news | FOX 26 | MyFoxHouston

Unemployment fell in half of US states in May

Posted: Updated:

AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Unemployment rates fell in half of U.S. states last month, led by drops in California, West Virginia, New York and Hawaii.

The Labor Department said Friday that unemployment rates rose in 17 states and were unchanged in eight.

Hiring has been steady nationwide, leading to a better job market in many areas of the country. Employers added jobs in 33 states last month. The biggest gains were in Ohio, Texas and Michigan.

The unemployment rate dipped in the Northeast to 7.5 percent from 7.6 percent, and fell in the West to 7.8 percent from 8 percent. It was flat in the Midwest at 7.2 percent and edged up in the South to 7.2 percent from 7.1 percent.

California and West Virginia had the largest declines in unemployment among all states. In California, the rate dropped to 8.6 percent from 9 percent in April. West Virginia's rate fell to 6.2 percent from 6.6 percent.

Both states reported job gains.

California has also seen the largest drop in unemployment among the states in the past 12 months. Its rate fell 2.1 percentage points from May 2012. Nevada's decline of 2 percent was the second largest.

New York and Hawaii also had significant declines in May from April. New York's unemployment rate dropped to 7.6 percent from 7.8 percent, while Hawaii's fell to 4.7 percent from 4.9 percent.

North Dakota had the nation's lowest unemployment rate at 3.2 percent.

Nevada had the highest at 9.5 percent. It was followed by Illinois and Mississippi, each at 9.1 percent.

Nationally, the economy added 175,000 jobs in May, nearly matching the average monthly gain for the past year. The unemployment rate ticked up to 7.6 percent from 7.5 percent, but for a good reason: More Americans were confident they could find work and began searching for a job.

The Federal Reserve on Wednesday offered a brighter outlook for the job market and economy. And Chairman Ben Bernanke said the Fed is likely to slow its bond-buying program later this year and end it next year if the economy continues to strengthen.

Fed officials now expect the unemployment rate to fall as low 7.2 percent this year and between 6.5 percent and 6.8 percent by the end of 2014.

  • Your MoneyMore>>

  • Future of money

    Future of money

    Thursday, April 17 2014 1:27 PM EDT2014-04-17 17:27:18 GMT
    These days, when you check out of a grocery store, your toughest choice might be cash or credit.  But in a few years, there may be no need to carry dollar bills, credit cards, or stacks of cash.  It might sound like the stuff of science fiction but futurist and social scientist Heather Schlegel says it's not.
    These days, when you check out of a grocery store, your toughest choice might be cash or credit.  But in a few years, there may be no need to carry dollar bills, credit cards, or stacks of cash.  It might sound like the stuff of science fiction but futurist and social scientist Heather Schlegel says it's not.
  • IRS considers taxing work freebies like food

    IRS considers taxing work freebies like food

    Wednesday, April 16 2014 9:11 PM EDT2014-04-17 01:11:44 GMT
    In competitive job markets like Silicon Valley, companies are doing everything they can to entice the best and brightest -- offering freebies that have become the stuff of legend.Employee perks like free food at lavish cafeterias, laundry and even yoga are not unheard of.  But the taxman could soon crack down.  The IRS reportedly is looking at these perks and seeing if these companies need to start paying up for the free stuff they offer employees.
    In competitive job markets like Silicon Valley, companies are doing everything they can to entice the best and brightest -- offering freebies that have become the stuff of legend.Employee perks like free food at lavish cafeterias, laundry and even yoga are not unheard of.  But the taxman could soon crack down.  The IRS reportedly is looking at these perks and seeing if these companies need to start paying up for the free stuff they offer employees.
  • Social streaming video from your iPhone with YEVVO

    Social streaming video from your iPhone with YEVVO

    Wednesday, April 16 2014 8:46 AM EDT2014-04-16 12:46:01 GMT
    We met YEVVO's 26-year-old co-founder and CEO, Ben Rubin, on a rainy day in Madison Square Park. Among the four of us (Ben, me, my photographer, and the representative from Ben's PR firm), we had four smartphones and the free app Rubin created."What if you were going live during this interview and then somebody [online] started asking questions and then [that somebody] actually helped to create the content?" Rubin asked.
    We met YEVVO's 26-year-old co-founder and CEO, Ben Rubin, on a rainy day in Madison Square Park. Among the four of us (Ben, me, my photographer, and the representative from Ben's PR firm), we had four smartphones and the free app Rubin created."What if you were going live during this interview and then somebody [online] started asking questions and then [that somebody] actually helped to create the content?" Rubin asked.
Powered by WorldNow

KRIV FOX 26
4261 Southwest Freeway
Houston, TX 77027

Phone: (713) 479-2801
Fax: (713) 479-2859

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices