NJ: egg allergy exempts schoolchildren from flu shot rule - Houston weather, traffic, news | FOX 26 | MyFoxHouston

NJ: egg allergy exempts children from flu shot

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NEW JERSEY (MYFOXNY.COM) -

There is a growing controversy about whether children with egg allergies should be forced to get a flu vaccine.

One New Jersey couple refused to let their child get the shot fearing their little boy would have a terrible reaction because he has an egg allergy. The flu vaccine contains a trace amount of egg.

After appearing on Good Day New York, Jeremy Pereira's family has less to worry about. The 4-year-old and his parents were on the show because he was stuck in the middle of a debate about administering flu vaccinations to children with egg allergies.

The Pereiras say The Edward Walton School in Springfield, New Jersey, kicked Jeremy out of school last week because he did not have the flu shot. Jeremy's parents say they could not get a doctor to give them a note

Then Tuesday afternoon, the New Jersey Department of Health sent a letter to schools statewide saying: "After careful consideration, the DOH has made a decision to continue to accept egg allergy as a valid medical contraindication for the 2012-2013 school year ... the DOH apologizes for any inconvenience this may have caused and appreciate your continued patience and cooperation."

If your child does have an egg allergy and you still want to get a vaccination, Fox 5's Dr. Roshini Rajapaksa recommends a more controlled setting

"These days its recommended that if your child does have an egg allergy, they still should get flu shot but in a monitored setting with an allergist who can monitor them in case they do get reaction, must be watched for at least 30 minutes," Dr. Raj said.

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